Urban Survival: The Vulture Tool Kit / SHTF Gear

When we discuss survival, it typically revolves around wilderness skill sets. There are thousands of blog posts and videos covering the different ways to build shelters, make fire, signal for rescue and live off the land. Building these skills is critical to being a well rounded survivalist, however we tend to neglect the urban aspect of survival.

Sure there are more than a few topics on Every Day Carry gear and Get Home bags, but that’s about it. When I noticed this, I started to consider what it truly takes to survive in city, beyond having some high end backpacks and fire starters. True survival is all about resources and being able to access and collect those resources. Things like wood for fire or shelter. Water for cooking and drinking and the list goes on.

This inspired me to create the Vulture Tool Kit. A baseline, a foundation of tools that will give anyone the ability to breach and access secure building, siphon gasoline and collect resources in a total SHTF situation. Taking into account that over 80% of Americans live in or near major urban centers, having the tools on hand for survival makes good sense.

I started this kit build with my trusty USMC issue ILBE assault pack. This was my first pack way back in 2007, picked up from a Marine for only $25. The assault pack is very simple in design with a large zippered compartment in the front and one main compartment. Perfect for carrying large tools such as bolt cutters, a tomahawk and items that don’t need micro organization.

USMC ILBE Assault Pack - Vulture Tool Kit

Intel And Navigation

Any mission in a hostile environment has to include the following set of items, designed for observation, intelligence collection and navigation:

Steiner Safari UltraSharp: http://amzn.to/21VX6v1
Petzl – TIKKA Headlamp: http://amzn.to/1ZEyxRg
Map & Waterproof Case: http://amzn.to/21VXBoK
Notepad Pouch: http://amzn.to/1OniMs0

Intel & Navigation - Vulture Tool Kit

Cordage

Paracord and heavy duty zip ties are two items I can’t live without when it comes to resource collection. In order to help keep my paracord organized and easy to use, I added a spool that includes a mini Bic lighter.

Paracord: http://amzn.to/1Wpl4zc
Paracord Spool: 
http://amzn.to/1QYnMmE
Zip Ties: 
http://amzn.to/27dfiUK

Cordage - Vulture Tool Kit

Breaching Tools

Abandoned structures are gold mines full of resources. They can also serve as shelter sites and cache locations, but if you can’t gain access to the site, they’re pretty much worthless. This set of tools provides multiple options for breaching and discrete entry.

Coldsteel Rifleman’s Hawk: http://amzn.to/1UShLPm
Soutord Lock Pick Set: http://www.southord.com/Lock-Pick-Tools/Lock-Pick-Set-5-Piece-PXS-05L.html
Vaughan SuperBar: http://amzn.to/1USi9NR
Tekton Bolt Cutters: http://amzn.to/1Onkc5O

Breaching - Vulture Tool Kit

Cutting Tools

Collecting resources means having the ability to process and cut them down to size for transport.  In the future, I’ll most likely add a multi tool like the Gerber Diesel and a crescent wrench.

Wire Cutters: http://amzn.to/1USiPmn
Bahco Laplander: http://amzn.to/1ZECwgK
Stanley Hack Saw: http://amzn.to/1ZECAwU

Cutting Tools - Vulture Tool Kit

Fuel Collection

Abandoned vehicles are perfect source for gasoline in a post collapse environment. Addition of a fuel container and siphon kit makes perfect sense.

Laken Fuel Bottle: http://amzn.to/1OnkUQt
GasTapper Gravity: http://amzn.to/21W2aiM

Fuel Collection - Vulture Tool Kit

Foraging Bags

Nobody wants to stop and drop the pack every time they find useful items. The dump pouch allows me to collect wild edibles and small items on the go. The large trashbags can be used to line the dump pouch or store larger items.

Condor Dump  Pouch: http://amzn.to/21W2FJS
55 Gallon Trash Bags: http://amzn.to/1Nqo6Qv

Foraging Bags - Vulture Tool Kit

Water Collection

H2O is essential to human survival. This set of containers and related tools provides the ability to get water from local streams and access water outlets on commercial businesses in the city.

Canteen & Cup: http://amzn.to/1Nqoi2e
MSR 2L DromLite: http://amzn.to/21W3K4o
Sillcock Key: 
http://amzn.to/1scTIzS

water

We are a community of survivalists and preppers who ready ourselves for the unexpected. Taking this into consideration, we must prepare to survive in the area we live in. For the majority of Americans and for that matter, the world, we live in or near major urban centers. We must have a plan for survival in that environment. Shifting some focus from wilderness to urban survival will serve us well in an uncertain future.

The Vulture Tool Kit is a great start towards that goal and if you can think of any additions to my gear, please add them below!


If you liked this post, feel free to add your input in the comments section. The Survival Outpost can also be found on Youtube, Facebook and Twitter.

18 thoughts on “Urban Survival: The Vulture Tool Kit / SHTF Gear

    1. I really wanted to add that, but alas it’s too big for my pack unless I strap it on the side. My goal for this first build was to fit everything in the pack.

  1. I Like the idea of your urban vulture kit. I believe it would come in vary handy if SHTF and could save someone life. With that being said and because I’m ex law enforcement I just thought I would mention that having all these tools together in one pack like you have is actually eligal in a lot of states. (Know as burglary tools). I wood advise that they not be carryed around unless during a SHTF situation. You may have already been aware of this but thought as a fellow prepper/survivalist I would mention it just in case.

    1. Thanks for the input as former law enforcement. Which tools constitute burglary tools? I’ve gotten rid of the lock picks…so I’m assumed the pry bar could be considered as such?

      1. Without Rule Of Law. Under these circumstances, hindering yourself from survival items is not only foolish but bordering on stupid.

  2. Under California law any and all of your listed Breaching and Cutting tools would be “Burglary tools”. Two factors however, was the search of your car legal AND was your “intent” to use the tools to illegally enter a building or vehicle. Legal or illegal search is either/ or ….proving “intent” is key to the crime. Probably pack your kit and leave it home until you need it during SHTF.

    1. Everything is illegal in Cali 🙂 But seriously, yes there is no need to keep this in your vehicle full time. I would only use this if absolutely necessary.

  3. As requested:
    An alternative to ‘cutting tools’, I usually refer to them as ‘sharps’.

    Here are my thoughts on the subject. The tool lists are near the end.

    My thoughts on post-disaster and PAW salvage

    Many people will immediately proclaim that anything done during and after a major disaster of essentially any type that involves taking anything from any place that is not your own property is looting. In many situations they will be right by just about any definition of the word.

    However, there are many other words that can be used in those situations that will apply, based on how they are defined. Sometimes people have their own definitions of words, including looting. Looting to many is any act of taking something that does not officially belong to you. Currently, pretty much everything does belong to someone. So, taking it from them without permission would be stealing. Or, in a disaster situation, looting.

    I believe ownership is the key factor in the use of words about taking things that do not belong to the person taking them. As in a post disaster situation or a full post-apocalyptic world situation, what about things that really no longer have an owner.

    The original owner is now dead, or long gone and never coming back. No one with familial or business ties with them is still around. That item, essentially, no longer has an owner. So how can taking it be considered looting? The only way, as I see it, is if a higher authority lays claim to everything that no longer has an owner that could reasonably be expected to be in a position to ever lay claim on the item.

    Say, the town council, or the county, or the state, or the federal government, or the National Guard, or simply a Warlord that says so. Those entities would consider anyone besides themselves or their agents that took anything from what they consider their jurisdiction or territory a looter. But, in reality, do they have any more real of an authority than a given individual.

    That debate will probably never be settled, though it will come up constantly before, during, and after any and all situations where it would apply. So, as always, I am going to provide my own definitions and justifications for what I think I would do in post disaster situations and a post apocalyptic world in terms of taking items that I do not own that I might find or run across.

    So, the definitions:

    1) Looting: Pretty much what I said above. Taking something during and after a disaster or in a PAW that does still have an owner, even may not be at hand. Primarily for the benefit of the person taking the item(s).

    2) Scavenging: Taking items with no discernable or likely owner that are simply found while in an area. Some minor searching, but not really organized. Primarily for the benefit of the person(s) taking the item(s), and any group they are with.

    3) Recovery: A purposeful action of going after highly useful and needed specific items known to not have an owner, from an area where the items are at risk of destruction, damage, or of being taken by others that are likely to use them in harmful ways. Often for the benefit of the person(s) taking the item(s), but also likely to be done for the benefit of a larger group and community.

    4) Salvaging: A purposeful action of seeking out and taking generally useful items in areas where there are no owners around. Often for the benefit of the person(s) taking the item(s), but also likely to be done for the benefit of a larger group and community.

    5) Mining: A purposeful action of going into an area where there are likely items with no owners, and taking anything and everything that might have a use at some point in time in a post disaster environment or PAW. Often for the benefit of the person(s) taking the item(s), but also likely to be done for the benefit of a larger group and community.

    With those definitions in mind, here are my thoughts on what I believe I would do and consider acceptable if I ever wind up in a situation where a disaster has occurred, and people in an area have died or left the area abandoning completely everything they did not take with them with no intent of returning for any of it, or assigning ownership of any of it to someone else.

    Once things were settled down, and safe enough to be out and about, for at least a few hours at a time, I believe I would go on a recovery expedition to obtain items that could be critical to survival in the future for myself and for others. Either for use, or in some cases to keep them out of the hands of people that would be likely to harm me or others.

    Things such as medical equipment and supplies, for the first reason, and weapons and ammunition for the second. Additional items I would be going after are things that have limited shelf-life and will be wasted if not recovered and used within their useful lifespan. Fuel being a good example, and many foods being another. Everything recovered would be documented. Efforts to document the location and condition of other items in the area will be taken.

    Once those very important essentials are taken care of, and time and circumstances permit, salvage trips would be undertaken to obtain useful items for myself and for those with whom I am affiliated and associated, probably with their assistance. The documentation done during the early recovery efforts will be used, as well as thorough searches undertaken to find useful items. Again, everything would be documented, as well as notations of possible assets that might justify mining the area in the future.

    Without violating operation security and safety, information would be left at the locations where items were taken, in case any of the items did turn out to have a legitimate owner. If contacted by an owner, every effort would be made to return the item, or compensate the owner for the item.

    As long as there are items that might be used to aid in the recovery and rebuilding of the community, the recovery, salvage, and mining operations would continue to gain possession and control of items that would otherwise go to waste, or be taken and used against the community, unless the items were safe where they were. And again, everything would be documented, to allow any owners to be compensated, and to simply establish a historical record of the times.

    That would be the process. Some of the places that would be of initial interest would be (as listed in the article) restaurants, taverns/bars, schools, hospitals, libraries, office buildings, factories, and warehouses. For the reasons given in the article, but also for several more in each case, primarily in the later stages, though given opportunity and time, some of the additional items would also be taken.

    Lightbulbs, for instance. Any and all writing instruments and useable paper. Computer and communications equipment. All for use in the future.

    If there were some immediate needs above and beyond the things listed in the article, items such as doors and even their frames. Plumbing items. Some types of furniture. Shelving and storage gear.

    I would add to the list in the article several things for the initial trips.
    1) Medical clinics for the same reasons as the hospitals.
    2) Medical equipment businesses.
    3) Office supply stores: many have food items, maintenance and cleaning items, bottled water, storage items, and quite a few other immediately useful items in addition to the ‘office’ items.
    4) Hardware stores. Too many items to list of things that will be needed.
    5) Welding supply stores. Same as hardware stores.
    6) Specialty stores such as Lowes, Home Depot, Best Buy, Barnes & Noble, Hobby Lobby/Michaels, Baby-R-Us, Farm & Ranch stores. All have items that will be needed, some of them relatively soon, others later on.
    7) Truck stops. Probably not for fuel initially, as there will be a great deal of competition for it, which will probably prove dangerous. But there are plenty of other things that will be useful, from lubricants to communications gear, to tools and hardware.
    8) Garages and Auto Parts stores. Tools and parts galore.
    9) Marinas and water sports stores. Any number of useful items, with fuel treatment items among them.
    10) Sporting goods stores. A huge number of useful items. And some will have weapons and ammunition.
    11) Gun stores. Pretty obvious.

    And a few that will be highly controversial. Use your own judgement, based on your morals and beliefs, on whether you will take anything from the locations on this list:
    1) Coin shops and any stores that deal in precious metals in coin or any other form.
    2) Jewelry stores and any stores that deal in gemstones and jewelry making supplies.
    3) Government facilities, primarily police stations and National Guard locations, and possibly fire department facilities and city/county/state maintenance facilities.

    Now, I debated on where to put Pawn Shops. They will be a great resource, if abandoned, and even if heavily picked over. The hesitation is the same as the first two locations in the list just above. Precious metals and jewelry. Do you or do you not. And they often have weapons, though little ammunition. But lots of tools and usually some useful communications gear. Take what you are comfortable with if the situation arises, and leave what you are not comfortable with.

    I did not put things like Walmart, Sam’s Club, Costco, most grocery stores, local distribution centers, warehouses, restaurants, bakeries, casinos, restaurant supply stores, and such on the primary list, as I believe they will be some of the very first places hit. Later on, after things calm somewhat and the die-off is in full swing, then I would probably go take a look. It is doubtful that everything was taken.

    People take what they think they really need, plus many will take what they want, as well, such as high-end items like big-screen TVs, jewelry, and such. Very few will think to take many of the mundane items of daily life. I think at least some of those types of items will still be in the stores.

    Some things will be damaged, either from simple vandalism, to damage from the elements if the building doors are left open, destroyed, or removed. There could also be some damage to some things by animals. I still believe I will be able to mine a great number of things that will prove useful to me, now, or someone else, later.

    However, I consider them a secondary source, so they are not on the list.

    In addition to the above, there are places that undoubtedly have some useful items and resources, but again, I consider them secondary to the primary list. There are exceptions to many of these as well as the above, where a quick incursion to recover certain very important or vulnerable items I would probably try to do.

    Other places that have large numbers of customers on a regular basis, that either serve food as part of the operation, or have at least some for customers that want or need a meal while at the facility.

    Gyms and workout places, the country clubs and independent golf courses, movie theaters and stage theaters, amusement parks, most office buildings and strip mall businesses, schools, factories, and similar businesses and operations.

    A whole other class of places that will have quite a few useful items will have people going through them. I am not sure just how thoroughly, though. They are on the ‘last thing to check’ list. Dumpsters in some areas, landfills, junkyards, recycling centers, and other places that have things that have been thrown away. Another business that sort of fits in the category, but not quite as there could be an owner around. That is antique shops. Not the upscale furniture, lamp, and decorative items antiques, but, basically, the junk shop antique shops. Ones with old stuff that may or may not work, and if it does not work, might or might be fixable. Old, and very old versions of modern things we use now. There is no telling what could be in them.

    However, since they are a business that could still have an owner, I intend to wait quite some time before I check them. Unless there is something specific or two that I have found there and just not acquired, I might try to do a barter/trade early on to get the item.

    Finally we come to things that I do not even like thinking about, due to the number of deaths that are very likely to occur if anything major happens. Prisons, hospices, elderly care facilities, children’s and adult’s day care facilities, pet shops, zoos. While the elderly care facilities might just have some very alive people in them, intelligent, skilled, and willing, there will be many dead, unless the place is set up as a prepper place. And that is not likely. So, I am not going to even try to take anything from those that are still managing to stay alive. I might even help with some humanitarian aid supplies. Since I cannot take care of everyone, however, they will pretty much be on their own if their families or the employees cannot care for them. It would be a long time before I went back. The same goes for day care facilities. At least those exclusively for adults. For the same reasons. Children’s day care… I cannot see the children being left there. Someone will be taking them. Parents where possible, other family if needed, and some staff, even complete strangers, which might be good, or it might not. It is likely that there will be children in them if it is a catastrophic event that happens in the day time.

    And there are many more that will be specific to an area, and places that will have items that apply to specific situations that different preppers will have. Ports might have one or more cruise ships in port to take on supplies and passengers. Farming areas could have grain silos and other food product storage such as apples and other fruits stored for a time before being put on the market.

    Two other places that will have some very useful items are libraries and storage facilities. The libraries for sure. The storage facilities almost for sure. There will be some major problems with trying to salvage storage facilities. There will be no good way to determine ownership of the goods. And the other is that quite a few people will likely have the same idea. Especially if they go there to get their own stuff and see others breaking into the units. There will either be a battle, or the ones getting their own stuff may just start raiding the other units themselves. I will avoid the places until well after things settle down and there are not nearly as many people around.

    The library, though creates a mixed set of feelings. I would want to go in immediately to get many of the resources the library contains. Some for my own use, but many to simply preserve for future generations. I do believe that there will be many people going to libraries for shelter, and to get information. If any one of them is careless and a fire starts, we might lose a whole library worth of information. I will simply have to make the decision at the time.

    Now, some general thoughts on the whole process.
    1) Unless there is a very specific reason to go alone, do not.
    2) Scout any area you think might have items you want or could use.
    3) Make a plan based on the scouting information.
    4) Always be ready to defend yourself getting to a location, during the operation, and when going home. Both convoy defense, group defense, and individual defense.
    5) Best to have guards posted, including an overwatch.
    6) Have what is required to get things back to where you want them to be.
    7) Consider using staging areas if large areas are being worked.
    8) Be prepared for confrontations and have a plan on how to deal with them.
    9) Be prepared to leave an area immediately if it becomes obvious that others have a claim on the items, legitimate or not.
    10) Be extremely thorough.
    11) Depending on the actual scenario, be aware of any environmental dangers, such as radiation; lingering chemicals or biological elements whether military or simply leaks; damaged buildings; falling hazards; overhead hazards; enclosed space dangers; etc.
    12) Have the tools and other equipment to safe get what you want. Do not take risks that could get you or anyone hurt during any recovery effort. If you cannot get something safely with what you have with you, go get it first, and then make the effort.

    And, based on the last item in the list, here are some Salvage, Recovery, & Resource Mining tool ideas:

    Vehicle Salvage, Recovery, & Resource Mining Tool Kit
    Tan Scott-e-vest (carries most important items)
    Maxpedition Incognito pack
    Petzl Tac-TIKKA +RGB w/extra batteries
    Quality high-power LED flashlight w/extra batteries
    24x Cyalume 6” snap lights (16x white 8-hr, 4x green 12-hr, 4x red/orange 12-hr)
    Water-resistant map w/set of marker pens
    Quality compass
    Quality binoculars or monocular (NV would be nice)
    Write-In-The-Rain notebook w/2 WITR click pens & 1 WITR mechanical pencil
    2x wax lumber crayons in holders (1x yellow, 1x red)
    White, light cotton gloves (for delicate and valuable items)
    Thin pigskin leather gloves
    Heavy leather work gloves
    Heavy fireplace gauntlets
    Knee & elbow pads
    Bump cap, hard hat, or helmet (for tight spaces)
    P-100 filter masks (or full face respirator with air pump)
    Large silicone seal safety goggles
    Assortment of zip-ties
    Ontario Knife Company OKC-3S bayonet/fighting knife/utility knife w/sheath
    Leatherman Surge multi-tool w/bits
    Channel Lock 88 rescue tool w/pliers & wire cutter
    Silky KatanaBoy 650mm folding saw w/case & extra blades
    Stanley folding handle for saber saw & reciprocating saw blades (hack saw blades)
    Multi-tip screw driver
    GOSO 24-piece lock pick set
    Glass cutter
    2” & 5” glass handling suction cups (get good ones)
    Set of hand tools
    8” Bastard cut File
    Olympia Tools 42” folding bolt cutters
    Stanley 55-121 18” FuBar Forcible Entry Tool
    Stanley Entry tool 30”
    Concertina cutter
    CRKC Woods Chogan Tomahawk/Axe
    Cold Steel Special Forces e-tool
    Duraworx mini-planting too (a mini pick ax)
    Blazer PB 207 2500 degree micro torch
    WD-40
    Folding grappling hook/gravity hook
    1,500 pound fishing magnet
    2x 98’ 12mm static climbing rope w/eyes and carabiners each end
    Telescoping recovery pole w/ magnet, J-hook, heavy-duty net, safety line
    Chain link fence climbing steps
    10+ cheap door stops (add a 4’ lanyard w/loop for door handle for quick recovery)
    6+ keyhole blocker (to keep anyone from locking you in)
    Gas Tapper Fuel recovery kit w/2+ 1-liter+ fuel bottles/containers
    Gas Tapper Water recovery kit w/2+ 1-liter+ water bottles/containers
    12 Heavy Duty zipper closing zip-lock 1-gallon freezer bags
    12 Heavy Duty zipper closing zip-lock 1-qallon freezer bags
    Maxpedition tan Rolly-Polly forage bag
    Tyrepliers to pull tires off rims so you do not have to carry the entire thing
    Lkgoodwin PE2 6 ton chain fall w/20′ lift
    Lkgoodwin PE2 1 1/2 ton chain fall w/20′ lift
    Lkgoodwin GT-2000-65 cable come along w/65′ pull
    7/16” x 100 braided nylon rope
    5/16” x 50 braided nylon rope
    12’ sling rope w/carabiners each end
    Wespur light block and tackle
    Wespur heavy block and tackle
    Keeper 02933 3″ x 30′ recovery strap
    Stake down type winch anchor
    100′ 3/8″ extension cable
    Set clevis’, shackles, winch anchors, snatch blocks, tie-offs, etc.
    Hi-Lift First Responder Jack w/Jack-Mate
    30″ D-handle round point shovel
    48″ straight handle round point shovel
    8# sledge fiberglass handle sledge
    16# double jack
    5# pick/mattock
    Iltis Oxhead double bit felling axe
    Bauer 12″ x 8′ aluminum 28# scaffold plank
    Bauer 24″ x 8′ aluminum 41# scaffold plank
    12-16-168-05 14’x16″x6.25″ 12K cap 115# weight bridging ramp
    Little Giant 21626 13′-23′ multi-purpose ladder w/levelers 71#
    Husky 395XPW 36″ chainsaw
    Chainsaw case, protective gear, spare parts, chainsaw multi-tool
    Concrete/steel cutting engine powered saw
    Oxy/acetylene torch kit
    Oxy/acetylene 100′ automatic hose reel
    Oxy/acetylene portable tank & carrier 20cf oxy/10cf acetylene tanks
    Complete thermal Lance set w/back pack
    Rapid Fire thermal rod starting cartridges
    3/8” x 18” 25# box thermal rods
    3/8” x 46” 25# box thermal rods
    Porta-power hydraulic system
    Portable air compressor (or onboard air in the vehicle)
    Set of air powered tools
    Portable hydraulic pump & tank (or onboard hydraulics in the vehicle)
    Set of hydraulic powered tools
    Portable tripod hoist
    Folding game cart/transport cart (to and from vehicle if needed)

    Backpack Salvage, Recovery, & Resource Mining Tool Kit
    Tan Scott-e-vest (carries most important items)
    Maxpedition Incognito pack
    Petzl Tac-TIKKA +RGB w/extra batteries
    Quality high-power LED flashlight w/extra batteries
    24x Cyalume 6” snap lights (16x white 8-hr, 4x green 12-hr, 4x red/orange 12-hr)
    Water-resistant map w/set of marker pens
    Quality compass
    Quality binoculars or monocular (NV would be nice)
    Write-In-The-Rain notebook w/2 WITR click pens & 1 WITR mechanical pencil
    2x wax lumber crayons in holders (1x yellow, 1x red)
    White light cotton gloves (for delicate and valuable items)
    Thin pigskin leather gloves
    Heavy leather work gloves
    Heavy fireplace gauntlets
    Knee & elbow pads
    Bump cap, hard hat, or helmet (for tight spaces)
    P-100 filter masks (or full face respirator with air pump)
    Large silicone seal safety goggles
    Assortment of zip-ties
    Ontario Knife Company OKC-3S bayonet/fighting knife/utility knife w/sheath
    Leatherman Surge multi-tool w/bits
    Channel Lock 88 rescue tool w/pliers & wire cutter
    Silky BigBoy 2000 folding saw
    Stanley folding handle for saber saw & reciprocating saw blades (hack saw blades)
    Multi-tip screw driver
    GOSO 24-piece lock pick set
    Glass cutter
    2” & 5” glass handling suction cups (get good ones)
    8” Bastard cut File
    Stanley 55-121 18” FuBar Forcible Entry Tool
    Olympia Tools 42” folding bolt cutters
    Concertina cutter
    CRKC Woods Chogan Tomahawk/Axe
    Cold Steel Special Forces e-tool
    Duraworx mini-planting too (a mini pick ax) (or similar)
    Blazer PB 207 2500 degree micro torch
    WD-40 (small can)
    Folding grappling hook/gravity hook
    1,500 pound fishing magnet
    2x 98’ 12mm static climbing rope w/eyes and carabiners each end
    Telescoping recovery pole w/ magnet, J-hook, heavy-duty net, safety line
    5/16” x 50 braided nylon rope
    12’ sling rope w/carabiners each end
    Wespur light block and tackle
    10+ cheap door stops (add a 4’ lanyard w/loop for door handle for quick recovery)
    6+ keyhole blocker (to keep anyone from locking you in)
    Gas Tapper Fuel recovery kit w/2+ 1-liter+ fuel bottles/containers
    Gas Tapper Water recovery kit w/2+ 1-liter+ water bottles/containers
    12 Heavy Duty zipper closing zip-lock 1-gallon freezer bags
    12 Heavy Duty zipper closing zip-lock 1-qallon freezer bags
    Maxpedition tan Rolly-Polly forage bag

    And, if you really want to do some serious recovery, salvage, and mining work, a good PAWV (Post Apocalyptic World Vehicle) set up for such things, as well as other things, might just be useful. If anyone is interested I will post up my Rufus list. (Rufus being the name I have given a theoretical PAWV)

    Just my opinion.

    1. What an awesome comment so much great info, I think I’m going to take some of your advice as I work to build out V2 of my scavenger kit. Thanks!

  4. Look into the Eberlestock J51 Warhammer as a foraging pack , it can hold a 5 gallon gas can , and still have room for the foraging gear . It’s a freighter design and has room for a day pack in the bay of you aren’t carrying bulky item’s . One thing I didn’t see is any kind of first aid gear , which would be necessary around old building’s , cars , etc .

    1. First aid is important, I just chose to focus directly on the gear for foraging etc. THat Eberlestock is a sweet pack, pricey but nice.

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